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Nalini Malani: Vision in Motion

Nalini Malani: Vision in Motion

7 Dec 2021
31 Jul 2022
Location: The Studio

The trailblazer of experimental animation in the past fifty years.

Widely recognised as a pioneer of video art and experimental film, Nalini Malani is one of the most prolific cross-disciplinary artists working today. Her fantastical and multilayered creations, which are informed by her early experiences as a refugee following the partition of India in 1947, express a resolute commitment to investigating the effects of war, violence, and the repression of women. Malani’s animations and installations, as well as her paintings and performances, feature imagery that feels both personal and universal. Vision in Motion brings together three major artworks—Utopia (1969–1976), Remembering Mad Meg (2007–2019), and Can You Hear Me (2018–2020)—showcasing the evolution of her practice over the past fifty years as she embraced new technologies and ways of working. The exhibition highlights the artist’s distinctive methods of storytelling, which have the power to transcend the traumas of national divisions and address collective issues of social injustice.

Objects on Display

Nalini Malani. Utopia, 1969–1976. Two-channel video installation with sound, 16mm film transferred to digital video (black and white, silent), 8mm stop-motion animation film transferred to digital video (colour, silent). M+, Hong Kong. © Nalini Malani

Nalini Malani. Can You Hear Me?, 2018–2020. Nine-channel digital video installation with sound, continuous. Courtesy of the artist and Whitechapel Gallery. Photo: Luke Walker

Nalini Malani. Remembering Mad Meg, 2007–2019. Four-channel video installation with sound, sixteen light projections, eight reverse painted Mylar cylinders. M+, Hong Kong. © Nalini Malani

Nalini Malani. Utopia, 1969–1976. Two-channel video installation with sound, 16mm film transferred to digital video (black and white, silent), 8mm stop-motion animation film transferred to digital video (colour, silent). M+, Hong Kong. © Nalini Malani

Nalini Malani. Can You Hear Me?, 2018–2020. Nine-channel digital video installation with sound, continuous. Courtesy of the artist and Whitechapel Gallery. Photo: Luke Walker

Nalini Malani. Remembering Mad Meg, 2007–2019. Four-channel video installation with sound, sixteen light projections, eight reverse painted Mylar cylinders. M+, Hong Kong. © Nalini Malani

Nalini Malani. Utopia, 1969–1976. Two-channel video installation with sound, 16mm film transferred to digital video (black and white, silent), 8mm stop-motion animation film transferred to digital video (colour, silent). M+, Hong Kong. © Nalini Malani

Nalini Malani. Can You Hear Me?, 2018–2020. Nine-channel digital video installation with sound, continuous. Courtesy of the artist and Whitechapel Gallery. Photo: Luke Walker

Nalini Malani. Remembering Mad Meg, 2007–2019. Four-channel video installation with sound, sixteen light projections, eight reverse painted Mylar cylinders. M+, Hong Kong. © Nalini Malani

Nalini Malani. Utopia, 1969–1976. Two-channel video installation with sound, 16mm film transferred to digital video (black and white, silent), 8mm stop-motion animation film transferred to digital video (colour, silent). M+, Hong Kong. © Nalini Malani

Nalini Malani. Can You Hear Me?, 2018–2020. Nine-channel digital video installation with sound, continuous. Courtesy of the artist and Whitechapel Gallery. Photo: Luke Walker

Nalini Malani. Remembering Mad Meg, 2007–2019. Four-channel video installation with sound, sixteen light projections, eight reverse painted Mylar cylinders. M+, Hong Kong. © Nalini Malani

About the Artist

Born in Karachi, British India (now Pakistan) in 1946, Mumbai-based Nalini Malani works at the intersection of film, video, installation, painting, and performance. She is internationally renowned for her reverse paintings and immersive multimedia installations which often combine personal narrative with motifs from folklore, classical literature, and mythology to reflect on the collective trauma of the disenfranchised.

Portrait of Nalini Malani

Nalini Malani. 2019. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Johan Pijnappel

Image at top: Nalini Malani. Remembering Mad Meg, 2007–2019. Four-channel video installation with sound, sixteen light projections, eight reverse painted Mylar cylinders. M+, Hong Kong. © Nalini Malani

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